In the Merry Month of May

As the fine spring weather draws to a close, and the deeply oppressive heat and humidity of Korean summer loom on the horizon,  I tried to make the most of my final outdoor shenanigans before I’m consigned to the AC or at least the after dark until October. This May, I visited 3 festivals and a historical theme park. The later truly deserves it’s own blog post, so I’ll come back to it another time. For now, let me share a few of the marvelous spring festivals I made it to this year.


May 13th: Gamcheon Culture Village and Festival

20170513_135628-PANO

Gamcheon is a famous little neighborhood in Busan that has been on my bucket list of things to visit while living here, and somehow I made it a whole year without going! Lucky for me they decided to hold a festival this spring, which I found out about a whopping 2 days before it was set to take place. It is referred to (by the Korean tourism industry) as the “Machu Pichu of Korea”, but actually dates back to the Korean war.

20170513_141043During the war, Busan was the only city in Korea that was not taken over at some point by the invading northern army. While elsewhere all over the peninsula, whole towns were being leveled to the ground, Busan was becoming a haven for refugees as well as US and other foreign aid troops. The population crisis caused the unique housing style of Busan, which involves building houses and apartments right up the side of the mountains that weave in and out of the city.

I’ve often found this blend of urban and natural to be beautiful and a great improvement over flat concrete, but nowhere is it more on display than in Gamcheon. According to the sign, “The virtue of building a house so that it does not block the view of the house behind it demonstrates how this village preserves traditions of national culture in which people care about one another and live together in close proximity and intimacy.”

20170513_135839The houses are painted a cheerful array of bright colors that make for a stunning view from the ridge above. However, once you descend into the neighborhood, there is no end of quaint surprises in the form of beautiful murals, surprising statues, and wandering flower planters. The neighborhood is not only adorable, it’s become a hot spot for bohemian culture, local artists, musicians and other experimental creations.

As we walked down the main road, we were surrounded at once by the festival tents and lanterns overhead. Soldiers in uniform were having a blast dancing along to a local live music performance while shops offered multicolored balloons and delicious iced treats. There were about a million places for kids to try their hand at various types of arts and crafts. A section of the festival showcased historical culture with backdrops, costumes and traditional games. At the top of the hill, the local school kids put on a talent show, and a wandering parade of traditional dancers could be heard wending around the twisting and narrow roads.

20170513_134058

There were famous photo op stops where we took turns waiting to get the best view, or take a picture with the famous landmark. My friend and I went into the mock up lighthouse, but decided the line to sit next to the statue of Little Prince was just too long for such a hot day. Instead we wandered around admiring the variety of murals and other decorations. My favorites included a flight of stairs painted to look like a stack of books, some old pants that had been turned into a walking flowerpot, and the very creepy baby faced birds that watched us from up on the rooftops.

I realized I put off visiting Gamcheon for so long because I thought it was just a bunch of colorful buildings on the mountainside. Everyone says it’s a must see, but not enough people talk about what’s inside those buildings. I found Gamcheon to be a wonderfully unique neighborhood, not only because of it’s architectural design, but also it’s dedication to art and freedom of expression. Certainly a must see for both long term residents and short term vacationers.

Follow this link for more photos from Gamcheon.

May 20th: Busan Global Gathering

This was another last minute arrival. As good as the tourism websites are in Korea, there is so much going on, I shouldn’t be surprised that it’s hard to create a single comprehensive list. Even my native Korean co-workers are astonished that I know about all these events they’ve never heard of. At least I know it’s not just a language barrier?

20160521_194154I went to this festival last year when it was held at the citizen’s park, which a beautiful grassy park with trees, a beach, and a big fountain. I had a great time visiting all the booths from other countries and sampling goodies they brought. There was a large space in the middle of all the tents where we could flop down in the grass when we needed a rest and I ran into lots of fun people (most of whom have since returned to their own countries) and sat on the lawn drinking the German beer and Spanish sangria until the sun went down.

Looking back, I realize I didn’t even write about this event last year because it was so small compared to the other things going on around me last spring. Despite my lack of blog-love, I did have fond memories of the event and was looking forward to going when I heard it was being put on again this year. For unknown reasons, the organizers decided to put the festival in a different location this year. A location of dirt. Gaze upon the contrasting images of last year and this. One looks like a great day out at the park, while the other looks like a flea market in an abandoned sandlot.

Appearances and lack of picnic space aside, the festival was still fun. There was a new twist this year of stamp collecting. We got our guide pamphlets when we arrived and were told that a few booths around the festival were offering stamps. If we collected 5, we could register for the raffle. The booths giving stamps require us to complete some mini-quest. At the first one, we put on mittens with Korean letters and lined up to make a sentence that we read out one syllable at a time. Israel’s booth implored us all to put on a yarmulke and have our photo taken. It seemed a bit odd, since I don’t think women usually wear those, but presumably someone in the booth was from the Israeli cultural delegation, soooo…. not offensive?

Another booth required us to take a try on a stationary bike to generate electricity used to power the blender making the smoothies. The Indonesian booth was giving out prizes for a plastic archery game. I managed to score the second ring from center. I went back to the Spanish booth for more sangria and got talked into adding on some amazing seafood paella. When I came back by to compliment the chef and take some photos, he came out to meet me. It turns out he’s a teacher at the the culinary department of Yonsan University, so I guess I shouldn’t be surprised it was so delicious.

After perusing all the booths, which seemed to be more numerous and more varied than the event last year, we wandered a ways away to find some grass to sit on while we waited for the raffle drawing. We’d been told the drawing was at 4, however around 3:30 they started calling numbers from the stage, and we didn’t even notice for ages because it was all in Korean and the grass was so far away. By the time we got back to the stage, there were only a few more numbers before the raffle ended and we decided to head back to the main road in search of some Sulbing. Then as we were leaving, we heard more numbers being called! The raffle was fairly strict about winners claiming their prize within only a few seconds of being called, so we knew there was no point in heading back, but it was still rough.

20170520_150829

On the whole, I think the Global Gathering is a wonderful event and I hope the city keeps doing it, but it would be more enjoyable with plenty of places to sit and enjoy the food on offer or just take a rest as well as a more reliable time table for advertised events like performances or raffles.

Follow this link for more photos from Global Gatherings 2016 & 2017.

Haeundae Sandsculpture Festival

20170527_164304

I don’t know if I’m feeling jaded because it’s my second year in Busan or if the festivals this spring really were not as awesome as last year. Expectations can ruin just about anything, and maybe it was a good thing I didn’t try to recreate my entire itinerary from last year. One of the things I did revisit was the Sandsculpture festival at Haeundae Beach. Not only is a day at the beach a nice way to greet the summer, the main attraction of the festival, the sandsculptures, would be all new works of art made fresh for this event.

I also wanted an excuse to go back to the fancy secret bar in Haeundae that I discovered at the sand festival last year. My friends and I agreed to meet in the late afternoon for a leisurely stroll up the beach to take in the sculptures before having dinner in one of Haeundae’s multitude of foreign cuisine restaurants, only to stroll back down the beach at night at take in the night-lit sculptures before changing shoes and heading back inland for craft cocktails.

20160528_170612

There’s no way to be disappointed by giant sand sculptures. The amount of effort and planning required to create this beautiful and transient artform is impressive no matter what the subject matter is. Last year the theme was nautical liturature, and sculptures from stories like the Odessey (above), Gulliver’s Travel’s, and The Voyage of the Dawn Treader among others were scattered around the beach like very artsy mountains. Many of the sand mounds were covered in art all the way around, with hidden gems that made us want to explore every inch.

20170527_170816This year… I’m not really sure what the theme was. Each mound only had art on one side, yet despite the fact that there was a temporary walkway between the two rows of mounds (because walking in sand is hard), the art all faced the shorefront buildings, leaving only half facing the walkway and the other half showing their backs. The backs of the mounds remained smooth but for a single word that was presumably the inspiration for the art on the front.

In no way do I wish to denegrate the work of the artists. There were several very impressive sculptures. Merely that unlike last year, the art did not seem especially cohesive, and I was a little disappointed that there wasn’t more of it. As I meandered in and out of the mountains of sand, trying to capture everything with my phone, I found one very special piece about travel. Amid the representations of world famous landmarks and the couple taking a selfie (of course I took a selfie with the statue taking a selfie, what kind of person do you take me for?), there was a giant postcard expressing greetings from Busan and sent to Seattle, WA (which, as the city I have spent more years in than any other this life is the one I tend to call “home”).

I also enjoyed the “couple” piece, which was of an elderly pair expressing the growing old together dream, as well as the “rest” piece which was simply a mosaic of sleeping and dreaming (some of my favorite things).

20170527_17044720170527_171037

There were far fewer works this year, since not only were there fewer sand mounds, but each one bore art on one side only. I still had a lovely time, but we finished much faster than expected and spent some time just chilling out with cool drinks before leaving the beach in search of dinner.

08b48efe55c812ece9fbd57cb9e2fa69

Even though it didn’t offer the stunning art display I was hoping for, the day still managed to give a one-two punch for my brain. Part one was the shock and reminder that other white people exist in such large numbers. I’m the only foreigner at my job, and I can spend days not seeing another one while commuting between home and work and doing regular errands. Sometimes I go out and I’ll see a handful at whatever expat bar I go to, but since most 7627aab3b42cac8b205bb627a6521eaeof the festivals I go to are Korean, I’m still in the minority almost wherever I go. Almost. I don’t know what Haeundae looks like on a regular day because it’s so far from me that I usually go to Gwangan when I need a beach fix. On this day, it was like that scene from Lilo and Stitch where Lilo goes down to the beach to stare at pale tourists. Only most of them were fairly fit being recent college grads or military folks on leave. But so much white people!

The restaurants were full of us, too. Which brings me to part two of the brain punch: just because I’m suddenly in the minority here, doesn’t mean the struggle to stop my privileged thinking is over. The place with a menu that my whole group could agree on told us there was a 30 minute wait… not to be seated, just to order. We took up seats around a table and pontificated on what could lead to a restaurant having enough tables to seat but not serve everyone. At which point, my lifelong Americanness reared it’s head. We have some bizarre cultural assumptions about the service industry I’m still trying to break free of. They told 5745331-customer-service-memeus the wait ahead of time, and we agreed. That should be enough, but part of me was still, “how did they not staff more people on a festival day, the restaurant should be doing something to make up for this inconvenience”… Woah, ‘Murica brain. You didn’t have to come here. They did everything reasonable to make sure you knew what was going on. Check your entitlement! PS. There’s no tipping here, so when waitstaff are nice to you it’s just their job and not because they’re livelihood depends on the whims of customer satisfaction.

Living abroad is a non-stop self-evaluation and learning process.

20170527_214612After dinner, we headed over to The Back Room, a secret speakeasy style bar that I visited last year and loved. I had an old favorite (real whiskey sour), and tried a brand new concoction tried an Aviation, which is gin based cocktail with creme de violet, lemon and cherry. Fancy and delicious. We stayed out way too late drinking and chatting, which only served to remind me that every event can be made special with friends.

Check here to read about last year’s Sandsculpture festival and TBR visit, and to see the sand castle pics from last year and this year.


I had some hard times in the hot weather last summer, and again this year in the heat of SE Asia. It seems however much the heart is willing, the flesh is not down with heat+humidity. I’ll be putting up one more Korean spring adventure (for the Gaya Theme Park), and of course working to finish the stories from the Malay Peninsula. However, I plan to use the summer to work on a new project about teaching (the other part of my life). Even if you’re not an English teacher, I hope to give some insight into what it is we do out here for the curious and those considering the career. And don’t worry, I’ve already got a fall trip to the Philippines planned, so the travel stories aren’t stopping any time soon. As always, thanks for reading!

Summer’s Almost Gone

I know many people think that summer starts around May or June, but here in Busan the weather didn’t get ugly until July and it’s only just starting to get nice again now that October is half over. I have already shared my early summer adventures, June with the sand sculpture festival, drag show and Pride Festival in Seoul, July with the Mud Festival in Boryeong, and I’ve started to share the August adventure in New Zealand. Oh, and the Jeju September trip is in second draft… but, things in Korea happen faster than I can write about it and I’ve been getting behind on some of my smaller weekend adventures. So, what’s fallen through the cracks this summer? I got some parental visits (other people’s not mine) and had a chance to play tour guide around the Busan Tower, Yongdusan Park, Dadaepo Sunset Fountain of Dream, UN War Memorial Park, more Dala & Sulbing, and Beomeosa Temple. Plus, I took myself down to the amazing lantern festival in Jinju. Let’s check it out.


Busan Tower & Yongdusan Park

escalator-yongdusan-park-busan-south-koreaThis park in the Nampo neighborhood is up on a bit of a mountain, but there’s no need to climb up exhausting stairs because there’s an outdoor escalator installed to let you ride up in comfort! When we got to the top, we were already blown away by the great views of the city below and we hadn’t even gotten to the highest points yet. As we passed by the stage area, it was clear that a performance was about to get underway. There were plenty of people dressed in the standard white garb trimmed with bright colors and fun hats and the parents hadn’t gotten to see any traditional dances, so we pulled up a seat. I have since found out that cultural performances happen here every Saturday at 3pm between March and November.

20160910_142412The MC for the day was excited to see so many foreigners (not just us) in the audience and brought out a poor young Korean lady who was nervous and not particularly fluent to try and translate for us. Representatives from each visiting country in the audience were invited to come up on the stage and play a traditional Korean game of trying to toss a stick through one of 5 rings attached to a jar. My friend’s mom went up and they let her stand extra close because she was over 60 and she brought us honor by scoring the center ring! We didn’t sit for the whole performance, but it was a kind of musical story. From what I could follow, some performers arrived at a lord’s house and were invited in to party, but there were some rascals around who may have been trying to steal away or marry off the lord’s daughter? The language barrier was a bit of an obstacle to the plot, but it was fun to watch and clap along with.

20160910_145221We snuck out during a lull and headed to the main attraction of the Park, Busan Tower. The tower stands 118m high, but it’s also on a mountain so, it seems to be rather higher than that when you look down. For 5,000won you can get a ticket to ride up to the top of the tower where you can enjoy a stunning 360 degree view of Busan. There are helpful decals on the windows that identify major landmarks and there;s a little cafe where you can enjoy a snack with your view.

UN Memorial Park & Busan Museum

I went here in February with the EPIK orientation team and I meant to go back in the summer for the roses and azaleas, but it seems that I missed them because by September, all that was left of the flowers were a few fading blooms. One stunning contrast was this tree which went from a brown lace of twigs in winter to a full brush of vibrant color in summer.

The little streams that had flowed in February were dry, but there were beautiful dragonflies all around the pool and grounds. I think the UN Memorial is a beautiful park, but it’s also a sad one. My trip this time was enjoyable because I was hanging out with some military history buffs who were tickled pink to look at all the markers and statues for different nationalities. I’m not really sure what else to say about it, other than war is horrible.

The Busan Museum is just a short walk away from the Memorial park, so we decided to stop in afterward. Unfortunately, a large part of the museum is under construction this year, so we were only able to access the second gallery, but it was worth the visit, especially since they gave us free tickets to enter. It’s largely a history museum, but it focuses narrowly on Busan and the history of this particular region of Korea. Since I’m still learning the big picture of Korean history, it was occasionally hard to place things on a timeline in my head, but there was a timeline on one wall that lined up Korean history with Chinese and Japanese histories (which I’m much more familiar with) and that was a useful comparison.

Dadaepo Sunset Fountain of Dream

Who doesn’t love giant bursts of water and light choreographed to music on a summer night? Waaaay back in 2008 I went to Xi’an China for the first time and in addition to getting to see the Terra Cotta Warriors which the city is famous for, I managed to catch both the day time and night time editions of the Xi’an North Square Fountain Show (someone else’s video).

Later in 2015, I made it to the Dubai Fountain show (my video).

Both are astonishing and huge. The Xi’an Northern Square is 168,000 square meters (1 ½ football fields) and the fountain show covers most of it. There are dry spaces around the edges to stand, but the whole middle is full of moving, glowing, colored fountains. The largest one, the Fire Fountain, can shoot water 60m high. The Dubai Fountain show is in the man-made lake (121,400 sq m, a little more than 1 football field) at the base of the Burj Khalifa and it’s highest water spout reaches 140m high. It also claims to be the largest choreographed fountain show in the world. I’ve seen tiny versions of choreographed fountain shows in a few other places, including the Tokyo 20150823_200510Sky Tree (left) where the small fountain lights are coordinated with the tower lights high above. These shows are fun, awesome, wonderful, and sparkly, so when my friend told me he wanted to take his parents down to Busan’s own choreographed fountain show, I was all in favor.

I have to be honest, I expected something small, colorful and cute. I was completely blown away. Dadaepo is far out at the south western corner of the city, so you have to ride the subway line all the way to the end and then take a bus the rest of the way. And then walk several blocks. The fountain and lights are all flush with the ground, so before the show starts it just looks like a flat open space. 50f0There are some permanent concrete bleacher type seats along one side, but the rest of the area around the fountain had been filled up with plastic chairs to accommodate the higher number of spectators on the warm weekend nights. We arrived early and laid claim to seats in the front row, hoping that we wouldn’t have to worry about the crowd standing in front of us when the show started. Refreshingly, the Korean audience stayed in their seats during the show and we had a first class view. In both China and Dubai, the spectators jostled for the best standing spots and to get my video, I had to start standing in my spot almost 30 minutes before the show started to get an unobstructed view. IMG_0101This is 2,519 sq m fountain is listed as the largest fountain in the world by Guinness. I suppose that the show at Dubai is not considered a single fountain and is therefore only the largest fountain show. The tallest jet of water at Dadaepo is a mere 55m.
In case you’re wondering, the world’s tallest fountain goes to the King Fahd Fountain (right) in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia at 260m (which I visited in 2014, it’s tall, but not much else).


While the sheer square meterage of the event isn’t 3% of a football field, the show more than makes up for it in quality. The tempo at which the water and lights shift and change to keep pace with the music is astonishing. The colors come and go, making the water seem to appear and disappear, lighting up only a portion of the water’s path or changing partway through it to take advantage of the new shape to make a different effect. The fountain heads move. Water comes out at different speeds and volumes. There is such a wide variety present that I felt more like I was watching a special effects music video than a choreographed fountain show. This video on youtube is better than what I was able to capture. 

I understand they change songs on a regular basis, so although this was my friend’s second time to the show, the songs were totally different. After the final song, the fountain and lights are turned on a bit more sedately to allow people to come in to the water to pose for pictures in front of the lighted shapes or to run through the cool streams in the warm summer air. There is only one show on weekdays, but two on weekends, so you can see the second one if you’re late or just stick around and watch both because it’s amazing.

Dala & Sulbing

20160430_134641I’m not a food blogger, but sometimes food is just too good not to write about. I’ve done some basic coverage of these things elsewhere, but it doesn’t get old. Dala 100% Chocolate is this tiny hole in the wall chocolate cafe in my neighborhood in Seomyeon. The first time I went there, I had to try their signature dish, the dinosaur egg. This was an amazing concoction of shaved milk ice topped with crushed chocolate cookies and chocolate shavings with a giant egg made of cookies and cream candy. When smashed with the provided hammer, the egg reveals a scoop of truly decadent chocolate ice cream and a tiny chocolate dinosaur. If that’s not enough chocolate, you can pour chocolate sauce over it too. It takes at least two people to eat this dessert. Since that time, we’ve also tried the chocolate pizza (nutella spread, banana slices and toasted marshmallows for toppings, scoop of vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce again), and for the two separate parental visits this summer, I also managed to try the fruit fondue (kiwi, grape, orange, grapefruit and banana… turns out grapefruit in chocolate is awesome), the “special brownie” (molten chocolate inside!), and the chocolate churros (churros you dip in chocolate). Let us not forget the milkshakes, which come in a variety of chocolate compliment flavors and can be made white, milk or dark. I don’t just love this place for it’s chocolate, but because it’s good chocolate. It’s not too sweet and they do a good balance of flavors in each dish so you don’t get tired (as if that were possible) of a single chocolate flavor. I think we’re about halfway through the menu now, and if the weather keeps cooling off, I’ll get to try their hot drinks soon!

20160307_191911
My first encounter with sulbing was during my first week at work when my co-teachers took me out for dessert after our first staff dinner. It pretty much blew my mind and I’ve been trying to drag everyone I know there ever since. The season fresh fruit flavor that was there in March was the strawberry cheesecake, and while they have strawberry on the menu year round, it’s just frozen berries out of season. However, the summer seasonal flavor was in full force and we got to indulge in the melon-cheese-yogurt madness. The uniqueness of sulbing as opposed to bingsu is what the ice is made of. The traditional shaved ice desserts just use water ice. The Korean Dessert Cafe (a chain by the way, look for it if you’re here) and a few other places make a different dessert using frozen milk for a richer taste. 20160730_174636-1The melon special was not just using frozen milk, but frozen yogurt… and not the kind you’re thinking. Imagine you mix some yogurt with milk or water until it’s all liquidy, then freeze it solid, then shave it off into teeny tiny snowflakes. Ok. Now, take a honeydew melon (the green ones) and cut it in half. Hollow it out and freeze the shell. That frozen melon rind is now our bowl, filled with the snowflake texture frozen yogurt and topped with some cubes of what I can only describe as cheesecake filling. 20160730_175713Now, over the whole thing, put the melon you removed from the rind, the hemisphere of melon, all of it. The dish was served with a big plastic knife so we could cut up the melon for ourselves. It was the perfect combination of sweet, tart and creamy to refresh us in the summer heat.

Beomeosa Temple (more pictures)

That’s really redundant, since “sa” means temple, but for the ease of transliteration, that’s what people tend to call it. It literally means “heavenly fish temple”. According to tradition, there is a well on the top of Mt. Geumjeongsan and the water of that well is gold. The golden fish in the well rode the colorful clouds and came down from the sky. This is why the mountain is named Geumsaem (gold well) and the temple is named ‘fish from heaven’. Its one of the most unique temples I’ve had the opportunity to visit. It wasn’t even high on my list of temples to see in Busan, but one of the visiting parentals had read about in Lonely Planet and was dead set on going so we set off to the northern edge of the city to ascend the mountains on a warm and misty Saturday.

We took the subway to the Beomeosa stop then decided to hire a taxi to take us up the mountain rather than wait for the bus. The driver didn’t turn on the meter, but helpfully explained his fare to us. We were 4 people and the bus would cost us 1.3 each, totalling 5.2 and he was going to charge us 6. Compared to the meterless taxis in China, it was truly refreshing to have a driver not try to take advantage of four foreigners at a tourist site. As we were driving up the mountain, he pointed out a spot where lots of taxis were stopping and said we could easily catch one back down from there and expect to pay a little less going back, but he drove us all the way to the highest car park so we didn’t have to trek up the mountainside.

20161001_131512When we arrived, a very nice older Korean lady offered to explain a little bit about the main gate to us in English and we got to hear a little history of the naming of the temple and the unique four pillar style that makes this era of architecture distinctive. As we ascended the stairs and passed through several gates decorated with bright lanterns and beautiful paintings we moved through a hall of fearsome statues and finally emerged into the main courtyard. The temple was originally built about 1,300 years ago, but was destroyed during a Japanese invasion in 1592 and later rebuilt in 1713, but a few stone remnants and one stone pagoda left from the original still stand in the wide open square. The temple is dedicated to the practice of Seon Buddhism, which is the Korean descendant of Chan Buddhism the same way Zen in Japan is.

Buildings for various types of study, practice and prayer surrounded the square and monks and supplicants came in and out about their business. We heard chanting, drums and bells and the smell of incense was faint but pervasive. There was a spring near a large rock, presumably the ‘golden well’, where we could drink fresh clean water from the ground with no worries of pollution or infections. There was a hidden path that led around behind the main grounds to a smaller hall of prayer and some living quarters where we found piles of tiny rocks and beautiful blooming flowers.

After exploring the main temple grounds, we wanted to visit one of the eleven hermitages nearby. I’d read online that the Blue Lotus Hermitage was both the easiest to get to and the prettiest, so I asked for directions at the souvenir stand and we headed further up the mountain road. Within a few minutes of walking, we spotted a giant golden Buddha in the distance and soon we came to the Hermitage itself. There were hardly any people there, but the courtyard was a stepped platform covered in statues of sages and Bodhisattvas with the golden Buddha at the peak and center. The entire day was gray and the mountains were wreathed in mist, giving our temple visit a quiet and magical feeling. I hope I can find time to go back in another season to see the mountain foliage in different phases (especially in May for the famous wisteria blooms) or maybe even try my hand at one of the overnight “temple stay” opportunities that allow visitors to experience the monastic life for just one day.

20161001_145448

Jinju Lantern Festival (photo album)

20161008_170238Also called the Jinju Namgang Yudeong Festival, it is held in honor of the fallen during the seiges by Japanese soldiers in the Imjin War in 1592-3 (the same time frame the orginal Beomeosa Temple was destroyed). During the war, lanterns were used as military signals, a means of communicating with reserve forces, and as a way to keep in touch with family members outside of Jinjuseong Fortress. Even after the war, people continued the tradition of floating lanterns down the river to pay tribute to the brave souls that had been lost during battle. Today, the festival is far more than a few lanterns on the river and instead is a whole palisade of life size and larger than life lanterns floating on the river and filling the riverside park where the fortress once stood.

It took us about 2 hours to get there in total, although the intercity bus is less than 90 minutes. We were able to walk down to the river from the bus station and get a daylight preview of the lanterns. We also walked around the festival tents and enjoyed a local specialty of Jinju bibimbap. It’s supposed to be made with a type of spiced raw beef, but sadly our tent dinner stop used the sunny side up egg instead. It was very good, though, so we didn’t mind too much.

20161008_181542.jpgWhen we entered the display area, we were given arm stamps so we could come and go as many times as we liked, then we began our stroll down the riverside. The water was covered in giant lanterns in shapes of mythical animals and heroes as well as famous landmarks like Stonehenge, the leaning tower of Pisa, and the Statue of Liberty. There were floating restaurants, boat rides, and yet more tents offering delicious snacks.There were giant tunnels of red lanterns where couples walked hand in hand in the twilight.

20161008_175956Two floating bridges at either end of the display allowed visitors to pass from side to side without returning to the street level. The day had been rainy, but as the rain dried up, the sunset lit the clouds in shades of brilliant gold and scarlet.We crossed the river and ascended into the wooded area to be greeted with the most amazing forest of light. Unlike the Taean light festival where everything was wrapped in LEDs, the park grounds had become friezes of the battles done in light and cloth. Japanese and Korean soldiers filled the grounds attacking and defending glowing battlements. As we moved along the scenes became festivals, crowds watching bulls in an arena, people at work in the village doing daily crafts.

20161008_190131

There was a section of small, delicate lanterns on display like a gallery. More soldiers stood guard at every gate and wall. A landscape of giant mushrooms and insects took up one hillside. Enormous saxophones arched over a performance stage with live musicians. Glowing globes hung from the trees like ripe fruit. Overgrown flowers sprouted from the grass. Tigers wearing top-hats and smoking pipes smiled at us from behind trees. There were no gates or guardrails, and we were free to walk among the lanterns at will. There were tunnels of love and fields of snowmen. There were more lanterns than we could ever hope to see in just a few hours and we wandered back and forth through the park following winding trails and making our way from one scene to the next until we were forced to start looking for the exit in order to catch our bus home in time.

We got back down to the river and walked along more floating paths all the way to the far end of the park. My friend described it as “drunk walking” because the floating panels would occasionally shift to one side with no warning causing us all to lurch and stumble. The bamboo forest growing along the waterfront was filled with glowing cranes, frozen in the act of taking flight or catching fish. When we reached land again, we were greeted with the largest lantern structure of all: a giant castle with a dragon and phoenix on either wall and a crowd of lantern people celebrating below. Above the castle walls, large poles held LED fireworks that burst over and over again. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a lantern festival on such a scale.

20161008_205405


I feel like every time I think Korea can’t show me something even more amazing, it does, and yet before coming here I knew almost nothing about this country, it’s people or it’s culture. Plain old “weekends” become magical adventures in a land of light or a sea of flowers. Misty mountains redolent with the odor of incense and the chanting of monks are just a bus-ride away from beachfront karaoke bars. Dancing fountains are down the street from skyscrapers that hide forests of cherry trees between their towering walls. Hidden gems wait around every corner and there is always something to celebrate. Thanks for reading, I hope you’re enjoying my stories at least half as much as I enjoy making them. Don’t forget to check out the Facebook page or Instagram for updates and pictures. ❤